FAQs

Q.
What is R-Value?
A.

R-Value is the measure of the ability of insulation material to resist heat transfer. The R-Value is determined by placing carefully prepared test specimens between two plates in a laboratory apparatus and measuring heat flow through the insulation.

R-Value is a very accurate and reliable expression of how insulation materials perform with regard to conduction of energy in a laboratory apparatus. But people don't live in laboratories or only deal with the conduction of energy. They live in homes with real walls and ceilings, and in the real world of buildings R-Value is only one factor which determines the actual performance of insulated building assemblies.

Q.
What do you put in the attic?
A.

We can do JetStream eco Blow in fiberglass or Ecotouch fiberglass

But we recomend to use cellulose.

Cellulose. It has a higher R-value per inch: 3.8 vs. 2.2 for most blown fiberglass. This is especially important over the top plates of the exterior walls.

Many truss systems will not allow a full 18 inches of insulation over these areas. We only need 13.3 ” to achieve R-50. Cellulose is a denser material as well, so it resists air movement better in the attic, just as it does in sidewalls.

Q.
Will my house be an Energy Star Home?
A.
Our system and installation package will certainly meet the insulation and air sealing requirements of the Energy Star Homes Program. However, the program also includes proper ventilation, furnace and water heaters, etc.
We can refer you to a Energy Star Homes representative to help you with the program.
Q.
Can’t I just insulate my home myself? It looks easy enough?
A.
Sure you can. And you will save some money on the short term. But, unless you have a good understanding of air sealing and barriers, and where the thermal boundaries of your building envelope are, you just are not going to get a good job. Yes, fiberglass batts look easy to install, but unless you are very meticulous, you will end up with gaps and voids which will greatly diminish the effectiveness of the insulation system and it will cost you more money in a long run.
Q.
My neighbor had mold in his house. How does this happen?
A.
Many insurance policies now have mold exclusions, so reducing potential mold problems is important.

Mold spores are everywhere. They need moisture and a food source to grow and reproduce. Ninety-nine percent of all molds are considered harmless. In fact much of the mold frenzy, at the moment, is overblown. Nonetheless, it is still prudent to reduce the possibility of mold growth. We can help. Here’s how:

  • First, the cellulose product we use is treated with a 100% borate solution (completely non-toxic) which is highly resistant to fungal growth.

  • Second, the high density of the product and the fact that it seals the wall cavity so well minimizes the moisture in a wall system. Air movement is the primary transport mechanism for water vapor. Stop air movement in a wall cavity and you stop water vapor from entering the cavity as well, greatly reducing the potential for mold growth.